Concepts: Statistics on the rehabilitation benefits and services provided by Kela

Name of statistics: Statistics on the rehabilitation benefits and services provided by Kela

Statistical units

Applications

One rehabilitation application can be used to apply for several different types of rehabilitation services.

Decisions

Applications for rehabilitation are reviewed and decided at the local administration level in insurance districts. Decisions are either favourable or unfavourable, or they can be issued to stop the payment of a rehabilitation benefit. If the application is for several types of rehabilitation, all of which are decided at the same time, only one decision is issued. However, the types of rehabilitation covered by the decision are always recorded in the statistics are separate decisions.

Clients are provided with a reviewed decision if their rehabilitation plan or basis for rehabilitation changes. The most typical of such changes is the addition of a new type of rehabilitation in the rehabilitation plan, for example a follow-up period of outpatient therapy or a new type of rehabilitation. Reviewed decisions can be regarded as regular rehabilitation decisions. Nearly all are favourable.

Clients are provided with a cancellation decision if the course of rehabilitation is interrupted, the client is no longer entitled to the rehabilitation benefit, or the conditions attached to the payment of the benefit are otherwise not met.

The decision on rehabilitation allowance can be either favourable or unfavourable, or it can be issued to stop the payment of the allowance. A reviewed decision may also be issued concerning the rehabilitation allowance.

Recipients of rehabilitation benefits

The terms ’rehabilitation client’/’recipient of rehabilitation service’ refer to persons who were provided access to funded rehabilitation services during the year in question. The decision identifying the rehabilitation measure provided may have been made previously. Recipients of the cash rehabilitation allowance available from Kela under the Kela Rehabilitation Act are also included among rehabilitation clients. New rehabilitation clients include persons who have not received vocational rehabilitation, intensive medical rehabilitation, rehabilitative psychotherapy or rehabilitation services provided on a discretionary basis for at least two years.

Recipients of rehabilitation allowance include persons who have during the year in question received rehabilitation allowance payments on account of the Kela Rehabilitation Act or some other Act of Parliament, or who have received rehabilitation allowance payments under section 20 of the Kela Rehabilitation Act as a young person with functional impairment or under an apprenticeship agreement, or who have only received maintenance allowance payments. The decision on the rehabilitation allowance may have been made previously.

Types of rehabilitation

As presented in the statistics, rehabilitation is divided into vocational rehabilitation, intensive medical rehabilitation, rehabilitative psychotherapy and rehabilitation provided on a discretionary basis.

The type of rehabilitation refers to the rehabilitation service which the client has been given access to. Substantive requirements for each type of rehabilitation are set out in detail in the benefit guidelines issued by Kela.

Expenditure

The expenditure is divided between the cost of providing the rehabilitation and the income security provided during the rehabilitation (rehabilitation allowance). The expenditure is shown on an annual basis.

The rehabilitation expenditures for individual clients shown in these statistics are slightly smaller than the rehabilitation expenditures shown in Kela’s financial statement. This is because research and administrative costs relating to rehabilitation are not recorded in the rehabilitation benefit system but rather directly in Kela’s financial accounts. Changes in assigned debt for rehabilitation provided on a discretionary basis are also not included under rehabilitation expenditure in these statistics.

Factors describing rehabilitation clients, measures and costs

Age

The age of the rehabilitation client refers to their age at the end of the year. Age tables show both the age distribution and the median age to help visualise the age structure. Median age refers to the age at which half of the recipients are younger and half are older.

Diagnosed illness

Illness refers to the diagnosed medical condition underlying the application for rehabilitation services or the rehabilitation allowance. Data on the illness is available for those whom Kela has granted rehabilitation services, rehabilitation allowance for young persons or rehabilitation allowance during apprenticeship training.

The main diagnosis and up to two additional diagnoses are specified in the application for rehabilitation.

Diagnoses are shown in the rehabilitation statistics either at the level of the major diagnostic category, diagnostic category or the individual diagnosis. The diagnoses and diagnostic categories have been selected with a view to their relevance for rehabilitation.

The diagnoses and the diagnostic codes are based on the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), which was adopted in Finland at the beginning of 1996. Due to the adoption of the new classification, pre-1996 statistics which are based on the older classification are not directly comparable to the 1996 or newer classifications.

Occupation and professional status

The occupation of the rehabilitation client refers to his or her latest principal occupation. Occupational data is recorded for all clients who are 16 years of age or older.

The National Classification of Occupations 2010 is based on the ISCO-08 classification compiled by the International Labour Organization and adopted by the United Nations. The classification is based on the concept of occupational skill, which comprises two dimensions: skill level and skill specialisation. These statistics use a classification combining the occupational status and the occupation. The occupation is coded in up to two characters.

Region

The rehabilitation client’s municipality of residence refers to the municipality in which he or she was resident at the end of the year. In the analyses by region and hospital district, persons who live outside Finland are only included in the figures for the whole country. The population data are based on Kela’s general database, and refer to the situation at the end of the year.

Statutory basis for rehabilitation

The statutory basis for rehabilitation refers to the four main varieties of rehabilitation provided by Kela, as specified in the law: vocational rehabilitation, intensive medical rehabilitation, rehabilitative psychotherapy and rehabilitation provided on a discretionary basis.

Statutory basis for the rehabilitation allowance

The statutory basis for the rehabilitation allowance refers to the Act of Parliament forming the basis for the rehabilitation for which the allowance is paid.

Grounds of eligibility for the rehabilitation allowance

The grounds of eligibility for the rehabilitation allowance refers to the type and amount of rehabilitation allowance to which the client is entitled.

Clients’ pre-rehabilitation labour market status

Rehabilitation clients’ labour market status before rehabilitation is recorded. The distinction between those in and those outside work (the latter comprising persons under 16 and those on disability or other pension) is based on a rehabilitation perspective emphasising the employment goals underlying rehabilitation.

Abbreviations used in the tables

  • ASLAK courses (Vocationally oriented medical rehabilitation)
  • KIILA(Rehabilitation that supports the vocational ability to work)
  • KKRL (Act on the Rehabilitation Benefits and Allowances Provided by the Social Insurance Institution)
  • LAKU (family rehabilitation for children and adolescents)
  • NUOTTI coaching (low-barrier vocational rehabilitation for young persons)
  • STEA grant (Funding granted by the Funding Centre for Social Welfare and Health Organisations)
  • Taito rehabilitation (vocational rehabilitation)
  • Tules courses (Rehabilitation courses for persons with musculoskeletal diseases)
  • TYK rehabilitation (Rehabilitation designed to maintain capacity for work)
  • Typo courses (Rehabilitation courses for economically inactive persons)