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Coordination of child benefit and child home care allowance in situations that involve two or more EU countries

If the guardians of the child live, work or receive a pension in a country other than the one in which the child lives, they may be entitled to family benefits in two different countries. If your family is entitled to benefits from two countries, they will be coordinated to fit together.

This rule applies to EU and EEA countries as well as Switzerland. Of the Finnish family benefits, the coordination rule applies to the child benefit and the child home care allowance.

In situations that require coordination, first it will be investigated which country is primarily responsible for paying the benefits. The primarily responsible country pays the family benefits in full according to its own stipulations. If the benefits from the other country are larger, the other country will pay the difference. You cannot choose yourself which country you will receive the family benefits from. 

If a child’s guardians work in different countries, the child’s country of residence is primarily responsible for paying the family benefits. If only one of the guardians is working and they work in a country other than where the child is resident, the country where they work is primarily responsible for paying the family benefits. 

Examples of situations where family benefits are coordinated

 

Moving to work in Finland with children

Dieter has moved with his children from Germany to Finland for work. The children’s other parent stayed behind to work in Germany. The family receives family benefits from Finland. If the amount of benefits from Germany is larger than the amount of benefits from Finland, Germany pays the difference. 

Working in an EU country while the child lives in Finland

Anna and her family live in Finland, and she is on child care leave. The child’s other parent works on board a vessel flying the Swedish flag and is covered under Swedish social security. The family receives family benefits from Sweden. If the amount of benefits from Finland is larger than the amount of benefits from Sweden, Finland pays the difference. 

Working in Finland while the child lives in an EEA country

Erik works in Finland. His child and the child’s other parent live in Norway. The parent that lives in Norway does not work. The family receives family benefits from Finland. If the amount of family benefits from Norway is larger than the amount of benefits from Finland, Norway pays the difference. 

The parents work in different countries

Liisbet works in Finland. Her child and the child’s other parent live in Estonia. The other parent runs their own company in Estonia. The family receives family benefits from Estonia. If the amount of benefits from Finland is larger than the amount of benefits from Finland, Finland pays the difference. 

The parents have two different types of contracts in an EU country

Her Finnish employer sends Kaisa to work in the Netherlands for 2 years. She has a certificate A1 indicating coverage under the Finnish social security system (etk.fi) from the Finnish Centre for Pensions. Kaisa's child and the child's other parent also move to the Netherlands. The child’s other parent works for a local employer in the Netherlands. The family receives family benefits from the Netherlands. If the amount of benefits from Finland is larger than the amount of benefits from the Netherlands, Finland pays the difference.

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